About Elizabeth

Chair of the Toi Iho Charitable Trust.

Search for Maori made art

We spent weeks looking for Maori made art products in shops in Auckland recently and it was frustrating. Either retailers don’t know who their Maori artists are or the products were not identified as Maori made. The same old problem of our traditional adornments, artworks, patterns being made and sold by non-Maori while our own Maori artists are invisible.

For that reason, we are printing more Toi Iho labels and brochures for artists and retailers. Contact me if you are ready to use them. Claim our indigenous culture! As a retailer, if you have artists who are producing high quality work, make an application with them for Toi Iho. It’s time to get moving again.

LEWIS GARDINER IN TAURANGA

Hā: Lewis Tamihana Gardiner

22 June – 13 October 2019

Lewis Tamihana Gardiner (Te Arawa, Ngāti Awa, Whanau a Apanui, Ngāi Tahu) is a leading pounamu artist who is attracted to working with jade for its solidity, beauty and ancestral connection.

He is known for his unique design aesthetic, use of inlay and incorporating several varieties of jade in a single work to create depth and variety.

Hā: Lewis Tamihana Gardiner is one of three exhibitions, and an art education programme, that forms the Tauranga Art Gallery’s 2019 Matariki celebrations for Maori New Year.

The three exhibitions span the entire upper floor of the Gallery and include BLOOD WATER EARTH and Mātiro: A survey of photography by Kapua Joy Bennett.

Vitally important role of Toi Iho Retailers

Retailers are vitally important to identifying Maori artists work with the Toi Iho trademark.  The original motive for developing the Mark was to distinguish Maori products from others, particularly when traditional patterns are being copied by non-Maori artists.   Retailers are encouraged to step forward and identify Maori artists who are on the Toi Iho list (see toiiho.co.nz) and label their retail products.  If your artists create high quality works, encourage them to apply for assessment so that they can join Toi Iho ranks.   Having Toi Iho is an advantage for the buyer, the seller and the artist.  Toi Iho shows the very best of Maori art.

Toi Iho Retailers

Retailers are vitally important in identifying Maori artists work with the Toi Iho trademark.  The original motive for developing the Mark was to distinguish Maori products from others, particularly when traditional designs and patterns are being copied by non-Maori artists.   Retailers are encouraged to step forward and identify Maori artists who are on the Toi Iho list (see toiiho.co.nz) and label their retail products.  If your Maori artists create high-quality works, encourage them to apply for Toi Iho assessment so that they can join Toi Iho ranks.   Having Toi Iho is an advantage for the buyer, the seller and the artist.  Toi Iho shows the very best of Maori art.

I have just finished a frustrating search for Maori made art work and there is no obvious way of telling the work of our indigenous artists. In discussion with retailers, some guessed that ‘they could be Maori’ but generally said there was no way of knowing. Six weeks later, I have found beautiful taonga in Hastings, online. We are keen to enlist the artist and have her name linked to Toi Iho. Come on Retailers, join up.

Fiona Partington @ the Tauranga Art Gallery & the Royal Academy, London

Soft Paradise / Ka Rongo Te Pō, Ka Rongo Te Ao: Works by Fiona Pardington at the Tauranga Art gallery.
29 September – 2 December 2018

This recently opened, solo exhibition features a selection of Fiona Pardington’s signature large format photographic works that explore themes of nature, collecting and remnants of history.

The exhibition features 16 of her impressive works focused predominantly on still-life arrangements, alongside a pair of large-scale portraits.

Fiona Pardington is an award winning, internationally renowned artist who has been honoured in New Zealand and France. She is represented in the collections of The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa and the Christchurch Art Gallery, amongst many other public collections in New Zealand.

Principal Exhibition Partner: Cooney Lees Morgan
Support Partner: Starkwhite
Aligned with the Bay of Plenty Garden & Art Festival

Fiona is also showing work in the Oceania exhibition at the  Royal Academy of Arts, London   29 September – 10 December 2018.

 

 

Hiwirori Maynard glad to be home

After two years working in Dubai, Hiwirori Maynard (Rongowhakaata) is glad to be home. He was contracted to perform as part a four-person cultural group named Te Mana at the JW Marriott Hotel. He was well-trained for this having performed with Waihirere at Matatini (or the Aotearoa Maori Performing Arts Competition as it was then) alongside teaching in Gisborne. The Marriott has been home for Hiwirori a number of times over the years with different stints there in 2008, 2009-10, 2011-12 and most recently 2015-17 when he finished as Band Leader of Te Mana.

Hiwirori originally trained in the late 1990s at Toihoukura with Sandy Adsett, Derek Lardelli, and Steven Gibbs finishing with a Maunga Kura Toi Bachelor of Maori Art in 2004. Since then he has been working mostly as a kapa haka and art tutor in a range of schools including Te Aute College (2012-15) alongside maintaining a constant art practice, exhibiting across the country and working on commission, including Hakirirangi for Te Papa Tongarewa (2017) and MOKO Guitars (an example is below) for Hukarere Maori Girls College.

Those of us at Toi Iho look forward to seeing his new work.

photorapher David Frost

photorapher David Frost

Sonia Snowden and Maakarita Paku at Puanga Kai Rau, Otaki.

                   

Te Kāhui a Mataariki Wātaka Exhibition Title: Puanga Kai Rau ‘The synergy of Puanga rising’

Venue: Māoriland Hub   Date: Rātū 10-17 o Hongonui Disciplines: Tuhi, whakairo, raranga, tāmoko, pūoro, toi kupu, toi matarau, pāhoa, whakarākai, waiata, reo, kiriata, pakiwaitara Kaupapa: Te Kāhui a Mataariki – ngā tuku o te whare tapere, a cluster of Māori artisans, artivists, advocates, educators, practitioners, whānau hapū iwi residing within the A.R.T. confederation in collaboration with Māoriland, Toi Tangata International Gallery and Te Ihiroa Designs.

A week of creative activities engaging and provoking innovative thinking through the many disciplines of toi tawhito and toi hou. Aim: To collaborate as a collective of high profiled, established and emerging artists Vision: To establish Te Kāhui a Mataariki as an annual event Goals: a) To increase the presence of high end traditional and contemporary Māori art made accessible to a wider audience b) Build engagement, membership and clientele (local, national and international)

Artists: Sonia Snowden, Elaine Bevan, Diane Prince, Lorna Tawhiti, Taryn Te Uira Beri, Jerome Kavanagh, Maakarita Paku, Karangawai Marsh, Navajo Hibbs, Paranihia Solomon, Kaia Hawkins, Johnny Hauraki, Te Aomarama Wilson, Debra Bustin, Pip Devonshire, Hayley Galo, Jamie Berry, Pikihuia Haenga & Leala Faleseuga, Iriaka & Romaine EpihaFerris, Awatea Crawford, Renee MacDonald, Leah Warbrick, Te Kahureremoa Taumata, Pania Barrett, Tihirua Putaka, Aria Parker, Sophia Parun, Students of TKKM o Te Rito.

Tuesday 17 th July 2018 11am Artists in residence – Johnny Hauraki, Leah Warbrick 4pm Exhibition Closes

 

Toi Iho Gathering

A group of enthusiastic supporters met in Ponsonby on Wednesday 23 May 2018 to talk about next steps for Toi Iho.   Thanks to Trustee Moana Maniapoto for facilitating the hui.

Left to right back row:  Paula Morris, English and Drama Associate Professor The University of Auckland; Nigel Borell, Maori Curator Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki;  Vicky Thomas, ex Kura Gallery, now at the War Memorial Museum Shop; Elizabeth Ellis, Chair Toi Iho Charitable Trust; .  Front row:  Mere Harrison Lodge, Elam Alumni, Member of Haerewa Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki; Lisa Reihana, Artist, Member Toi Iho Chartitable Trust; Moana Maniapoto, Toi Iho Charitable Trustee.  Picture taken by Peter Baltus.

Reuben Paterson