About Elizabeth

Chair of the Toi Iho Charitable Trust.

Successful Grants

Ngahiraka Mason

Towards a critique on Māori Art, Form and Function before and after COVID-19.

Closing date:

10 Sep 2021

Funding amount:

$44,000

Artforms:

Funding Round: Arts Grants 2021/2022 round 1

Veranoa Hetet

Towards pushing boundaries working from the basic kete design and creating new designs using new materials & techniques.

Closing date:

21 May 2021

Funding amount:

$70,750

Artforms:

THIS CONTENT IS TAGGED ASCRAFT/OBJECT.

Funding Round: Arts Grant Round 8

Wi Taepa

Towards strengthening Mataraunga Maori using Toi Uku for all Maori and the development of new work in a large format.

Closing date:

10 Sep 2021

Funding amount:

$75,000

Artforms:

THIS CONTENT IS TAGGED ASCRAFT/OBJECT.

Funding Round: Arts Grants 2021/2022 round 1

Joanne Tito

Ki te hanga toi i ngā rākau Māori.

THIS CONTENT IS TAGGED ASVISUAL ARTS.

AWARDED: $63,000

FUNDING POOL: Ngā toi Māori fund

Rim Paul

Towards the research and development of my autobiography Rim D. Paul – Tōku Rerenga Pūoro, He Whakahuranga Wairua.

THIS CONTENT IS TAGGED ASLITERATURE.

AWARDED: $35,920

FUNDING POOL: Ngā toi Māori fund

Tai Tokerau Maori Artists Collective

Towards an exhibition of new work by TTMAC and Aboriginal artists.

THIS CONTENT IS TAGGED ASVISUAL ARTS.

AWARDED: $68,359

FUNDING POOL: Ngā toi Māori fund

Te Tairawhiti Arts Festival Charitable Trust

Towards a multi-Artform Regional Arts Festival spanning Te Tairāwhiti anchored in Tūranga-nui-ā-Kiwa, Gisborne.

THIS CONTENT IS TAGGED ASMULTI-DISCIPLINARY.

AWARDED: $75,000

FUNDING POOL: Ngā toi Māori fund

Whanau ō Toi Iho, keep safe and well during this coronavirus lockdown.

Kia ora koutou Toi Iho Whanau

Following PM Jacinda’s announcement this afternoon, we will all be withdrawing and isolating ourselves with our loved ones at home. Alert Level 4 starts on Thursday. While it will be difficult for many of you who are in business, considered at this time as ‘non-essential’, and you work hard making and selling most beautiful art, isolation is the only way that this invisible frightening virus can be arrested and lives saved. The mantra that ‘we’re all in this together’ is perfect. Take care.

KIA MAU KI TE TŪMANAKO, TE WHAKAPONO ME TE AROHA – HOLD FAST TO HOPE, FAITH AND LOVE. Israel Tangaroa Birch

Toi Iho – Rex Homan in Waiheke 2020

Te Rarawa, Ngāti Paoa, Te Ātiawa


Rex Homan was born 1940 in Thames, New Zealand of Māori, Irish and Scottish ancestry. He lived in Auckland in his early years before moving to the Bay of Plenty. Rex has earned international recognition as a wood sculptor in the 1960s and 1970s and began working in bronze in the 1980s. His current work is influenced by the culture of the Pacific and displays uniqueness in its diversity of form and dramatic flow of lines. Rex has exhibited in solo, group and jury shows. He has won several national awards for “National Wood Skills” and is represented in corporate and private collections worldwide.

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Toi Iho artists join exhibition

MAORI GROUP SHOW RELEASE THE STARS

11 February – 07 March 2020

HIRIA ANDERSON
RUSS FLATT
STAR GOSSAGE
BRETT GRAHAM

AYESHA GREEN (courtesy Jhana Millers Gallery)
NIKAU HINDIN
PĀNiA! (courtesy Mokopōpaki)
FIONA PARDINGTON (courtesy Starkwhite)

Director Tim Melville explains the genesis of the gallery’s 2020 opening exhibition, Release the Stars.

“When photographer Dr Fiona Pardington (Ngai Tahu, Kati Mamoe, Ngati Kahungunu, Clan Cameron of Erracht) selected Ayesha Green’s painting Nana’s Birthday (A Big Breath) as the winner of the 2019 Waikato Contemporary Art Award I had a reaction to the artwork that caught me by surprise.

Nana’s Birthday (A Big Breath) showed mokopuna with a range of skin colours helping their Great-Grandmother blow out her Birthday candles, summarising, as Pardington remarked, “a long life of nurturing and the simple life shared by families everywhere”. Ayesha Green herself (Kaai Tahu, Ngati Kahungunu) described it as “an exhale of generations [referencing] the infinity of whakapapa and the creation legend of Tāne breathing life into the first woman”. Green’s painting was a cross-cultural mash-up in terms of both style and content. It featured neither koru nor kowhaiwhai yet its Maori wairua was unmistakeable. It slammed me in the heart and it made me wonder. Who are some of the other Maori artists whose work feels Maori but doesn’t always look Maori? Who are some of the others whose practice doesn’t necessarily include the iconography that many understand as signifying ‘authentic’ Maori art? And if you were able to put some of these artists together what might an exhibition look like?

TMG artists STAR GOSSAGE (Ngati Wai, Ngati Ruanui), RUSS FLATT (Ngati Kahungunu) and HIRIA ANDERSON (Rereahu, Ngati Maniapoto, Ngati Apakura) were immediately interested when we talked about it. I hoped that FIONA PARDINGTON and AYESHA GREEN would say yes, and they did. Emboldened, I approached BRETT GRAHAM (Ngati Koroki Kahukura, Tainui), NIKAU HINDIN (Ngapuhi, Te Rarawa) and the anonymous artist PĀNiA! and was thrilled to get their agreement also. We had a show.

The exhibition’s title Release the Stars comes from a 2007 Rufus Wainwright album inspired – the musician explains – by a wish to start “opening up and following impulses” and by “the fact that it’s time to get out there and be part of the solution”. Wainwright’s goals resonated with me. After 12 years Tim Melville Gallery is finding its voice and, despite having much still to learn, I feel a responsibility as a Maori gallerist (Te Arawa, Te Atiawa) to try and represent a Maori world-view to our predominantly European audience of friends and supporters. How can we build bridges? How can we encourage connection? And, going further, how can we explore and celebrate indigenous relationships within Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa and with our Iwi Moemoea cousins across the water in Australia?

This February, as another Waitangi Day looms and the complex and shifting relationships between Maori and Pakeha are foregrounded once again, we are proud to be able to present an exhibition by eight artists whose work speaks powerfully and insistently about being Maori, today, in 21st Century Aotearoa.

The exhibition will be opened by Pita Turei (Ngai Tai ki Tamaki, Ngati Paoa, Nga Rauru Kiitahi).

Nau mai, Haere mai! ”

Photography: Kallan MacLeod